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Posts Tagged ‘fiduciary’

Four Tips for Keeping an Active Lifestyle in Retirement

You worked, you saved, you planned. Now, after all that, it’s time to retire. This big change is both exciting and a little scary. If you’ve defined yourself by your career, you may experience the transition as something of a loss. As exciting as the opportunity to make your own schedule and do whatever you want, it may also be a little disorienting. Not since we were kids on summer vacations from school did we ever have such open schedules to fill however we want, and even then, we had to be home before dark. Retirement is a big, exciting event in your life, whether you are excited or filled with trepidation. In this article, we will go over some lifestyle changes and tips to help ease the transition and get you the best retirement, for you.

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The Road Less Traveled: Taking Steps Toward Your Ideal Retirement

Have you given a great deal of thought about your “bucket list” recently? For most people, a bucket list consists of things we have always wanted to do and many of those things involve taking risks or traveling far away from home or exploring some other type of great unknown. I read an article recently in Financial Advisor Magazine that discussed regrets that people had as they aged. The article said, “Among the top regrets were: not following their dreams, not taking risks with their careers, not taking risks with their lives in general, and not being gutsy enough in the choices they made.”

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Practice and Courage: Why Retirement Is like Learning to Dive

Do you remember when you learned how to dive? Do you remember how you felt when you saw others doing it and you wished, hoped for the day when you would have the courage and agility to take that plunge and know that you’d land gracefully in the water? Do you remember how ungraceful that first attempt was?

I have this vivid memory of learning to dive. We went to this pool every summer during childhood and there were older kids and adults who used to take turns practicing their dives. From my perspective, each of them was better than the last. They would walk slowly up to the edge, look down into the water, bounce once with two feet on the board, then with just one– shooting their knee straight up in the air, then one final time before they raised their arms high over their head, and traveled in a perfect arc, making the most peaceful splash as they landed– arms, then head then torso and lastly feet into the water. I so desperately wanted to be able to do as they did. My dad, was eager to teach when I asked him to show me the secret. But he explained that there was no secret at all. What was needed was precision, an understanding of gravity and physics and, most importantly, courage. He explained that courage was most important, not because it would improve your dive, but because it would empower you to keep going until you perfected it.

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Emotional Investing and Consequences of Behavioral Biases

Distraction from the media, uncertainty or volatility in the markets, or pressure to buy and sell from friends, colleagues, financial “gurus” and other less than reliable sources for investment advice can directly challenge an investor’s ability to make consistent, rational and logical investment decisions. The barrage of information coupled with some inherent behavioral biases can make long-term investing a challenge for most people.

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