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Posts by David Shucavage

Smart Ways to Take Control of a Trust

Many successful families use trusts to minimize taxes, transfer wealth and protect assets from creditors and others. You may have already set up a trust, or you may hold an inheritance you received in a trust that was created decades ago. Trouble is, too many families relinquish more control over their trusts than they need to, basically hoping that the trustees they have put in charge will serve them well. They take a passive role in their trusts rather than an active or proactive role.

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Practice and Courage: Why Retirement Is like Learning to Dive

Do you remember when you learned how to dive? Do you remember how you felt when you saw others doing it and you wished, hoped for the day when you would have the courage and agility to take that plunge and know that you’d land gracefully in the water? Do you remember how ungraceful that first attempt was?

I have this vivid memory of learning to dive. We went to this pool every summer during childhood and there were older kids and adults who used to take turns practicing their dives. From my perspective, each of them was better than the last. They would walk slowly up to the edge, look down into the water, bounce once with two feet on the board, then with just one– shooting their knee straight up in the air, then one final time before they raised their arms high over their head, and traveled in a perfect arc, making the most peaceful splash as they landed– arms, then head then torso and lastly feet into the water. I so desperately wanted to be able to do as they did. My dad, was eager to teach when I asked him to show me the secret. But he explained that there was no secret at all. What was needed was precision, an understanding of gravity and physics and, most importantly, courage. He explained that courage was most important, not because it would improve your dive, but because it would empower you to keep going until you perfected it.

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The Rich History of Arlie Gardens

In our 30+ years in Wilmington, my wife, Sandy, and I have seen mind-boggling changes in the area as it has grown — some good, some bad. We’re so glad that there have always been people committed to holding on to those places and things that make Wilmington special. Airlie Gardens is one of those treasures, almost given up on a decade ago, but now a thriving part of our community

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January/February 2018 – Retirement Strategies Newsletter

Inside This Issue:

  • Savorez – A Must Try!
  • The Bookshelf
  • Sandy’s 5 Star Cider!
  • Saving Fuel in the Winter
  • Maintaining Winter Health
  • Upcoming Events in Wilmy
  • Winterize Your Home

Savorez – A Must Try!

If you’ve been reading our newsletter for a long time, you know that I’ve never used this space to hock restaurants. We are fortunate to have many wonderful restaurants in the Wilmington area, but I don’t fancy myself a food critic, in part, because I can only come up with so many sophisticated ways to say “Yummy!” It takes more than superior food to encourage me to write about a restaurant; it takes a level of personal bonding beyond taste and presentation. And that is exactly why this is the first time I’m writing about a restaurant.

I got the idea for this article when one of our favorite restaurants, Savorez, was named the top new restaurant in North Carolina by Buzzfeed and Yelp. And it’s ours, all ours, Wilmington! Are we lucky or what? Take that, Raleigh! Savorez is a charming little 36-seat restaurant at the corner of Chestnut and 4th Street in Downtown Wilmington. Its flavor palate is Central American, but you need only an appreciation for a good meal and the slightest touch of adventure in your soul to be delighted with Savorez. The staff is so friendly and upbeat that it doesn’t take long to feel like family (kind of like Mel’s Diner on a gourmet level).

Their regular menu is simple and delicious (Sam and David favor the Gatos Tacos while I ask for a spoon to capture every bit of the delicious sauce in the Langousta Y Coco—lobster ceviche), but you can never go wrong with one of the specials. It is with the specials that they exercise their creativity and allow their imaginations to soar. If you see a special you like, order it! You may never see anything quite like it again. Their cocktails are just as creative and unique.

We’re there a lot and, in fact, our family celebrated New Year’s at their first (annual, I hope) New Year’s Champagne Dinner. A great time was had by all. And the food was —you got it— yummy. And, of course, champagne!

The owner and chef of Savorez is Sam Cahoon (his father, coincidentally, is Larry Cahoon, a marine biology professor at UNCW, whom I’ve seen at a number of GenX forums advocating for our clean water). As a general rule, I can only see Sam’s torso through the narrow window into the kitchen, but he obligingly stepped out so I could take a picture. He has such a nice natural smile that I only needed to take one shot and it was just perfect.

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Understanding Retirement: Five Steps to Plan with Confidence

There was a time when people looked forward to retirement as a time for relaxation. But planning for the financial future is anything but relaxing for many people nearing retirement in the current economic climate. According to a 2016 PwC survey, just over half of Baby Boomers see their top financial concern as not being able to retire when they want to. That kind of uncertainty compounds the stress that many people often face with trying to save and invest enough money for retirement.

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Smart Ways to Build a Moat Around Your Wealth

Have you taken steps to protect the assets you have worked so hard to build?

Chances are, you know someone who has been sued. Maybe that someone is you.

The fact is, your enviable position as a successful person comes with a major downside: You’re a potential magnet for lawsuits—which may very well be frivolous and unfounded—and other attacks that can wreak havoc on your financial health.

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What Happens to Our Digital Assets After We Pass Away?

So, you’ve crafted a plan for how you want your wealth, possessions and other assets to be distributed after you die. But what happens to your digital assets—online bank and investment accounts, social media profiles like Facebook and LinkedIn, and access to shopping sites like Amazon and Ebay?

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Maintaining Marital Bliss Through Your Retirement Transition

Compromise is a key component in any happy marriage. It gets couples through the many roadblocks that life places in the path of a long-term, committed relationship. And while the ability to negotiate and reevaluate throughout the long haul goes a long way, even the strongest partnership can find itself buckling under the stress of retirement. The hopes and dreams of a what a life in retirement will look like can change over the course of a marriage. Couples who had previously expressed shared notions of what they want in their retirement may find themselves going in different directions when a life of work finally ends. Many couples who have had decades of marital bliss with little discord find themselves stressed and unhappy when retirement finally comes.

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Hurricanes and Tornadoes in Your Financial World

My wife Sandy and I sat huddled in the dark; the wind outside howled as if a freight train was going by. It was the fall of 1984, our first hurricane experience in Wilmington. Hurricane Diana raged outside for 2 days, it was the first major hurricane to hit the U.S. East Coast in nearly 20 years. Sandy and I made all the classic preparations: uselessly taping masking tape to all the windows and stocking up on water, batteries, bread, ice and—of course—beer. We had plenty of advance warning because, even 30+ years ago, there were satellites, radar, airplanes, weather buoys, and other means of assessing and informing us of a potential crisis.

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